18 Watch Out Situations, PMS 118

The 10 Standard Firefighting Orders and the 18 Watch Out Situations, as referenced in the Incident Response Pocket Guide (IRPG), PMS 461, provide wildland firefighters with a set of consistent best practices and a series of scenarios to be mindful of when responding to a wildland fire.

The 10 Standard Firefighting Orders are organized in a deliberate and sequential way to be implemented systematically and applied to all fire situations.

The 18 Watch Out Situations are more specific and cautionary, describing situations that expand the 10 Standard Firefighting Orders with the intent that if firefighters follow the Standard Firefighting Orders and are alerted to the 18 Watch Out Situations, much of the risk of firefighting can be reduced.

View the NWCG 10 & 18 Poster.

Download the zip file (16 MB) with all 18 individual images and the poster.

Click on image to enlarge.

1. Fire not scouted and sized up. A firefighter surrounded by green vegetation looks through binoculars in one direction. Far behind him is smoke from a wildland fire.

1. Fire not scouted and sized up.

Wildland firefighters scout and size up all incidents to gain situational awareness before beginning fire suppression. This Watch Out shows a firefighter too far away to effectively describe the specific fire behavior, fuel types, and weather conditions on the fire.

Download this image.

2. In country not seen in daylight. Three firefighters carrying tools walk in the dark. Their headlamps illuminate a large brush in front of them.

2. In country not seen in daylight.

Firefighting resources are often called to respond to fires at night in unfamiliar terrain. This Watch Out shows firefighters working at night in an area they are seeing for the first time which requires extra attention to surroundings and caution while working.

Download this image.

 
3. Safety zones and escape routes not identified. Three firefighters walk in separate directions. Around them are standing black trees that have already burned and flames from trees still burning.

3. Safety zones and escape routes not identified.

Lookouts, Communications, Escape Routes, and Safety Zones (LCES) are a critical approach all wildland firefighters use to engage in fire suppression safely. This Watch Out depicts a crew without established escape routes or safety zones.

Download this image.

4. Unfamiliar with weather and local factors influencing fire behavior. Three firefighters examine weather instruments while standing in a wide open, grassy area. Large white clouds appear to grow in the distant sky.

4. Unfamiliar with weather and local factors influencing fire behavior.

Weather forecasts play a crucial role in the planning and suppression of all willdand and prescribed fire operations and activities. This Watch Out depicts firefighters acquiring weather information but seemingly unaware of the incoming storm clouds which would directly impact fire behavior.

Download this image.

 
5. Uninformed on strategy, tactics, and hazards. A fire is burning on a hillside. A white airtanker drops red retardant in the foreground, where no flames are visible.

5. Uninformed on strategy, tactics, and hazards.

Wildland firefighters rely on coordinated strategies and tactics to efficiently suppress fires and avoid hazards. This Watch Out demonstrates an airtanker dropping retardant away from the intended area, potentially indicating unclear communication.

Download this image.

6. Instructions and assignments not clear. One firefighter uses a drip torch to ignite grasses on the right side of the image. Two firefighters spray water from a yellow fire engine onto burning grass on the left side of the image.

6. Instructions and assignments not clear.

The Incident Command System (ICS) is used to provide uniform chain of command on all incidents. This Watch Out shows an engine crew working in a counterproductive manner, without clear instructions towards an expected outcome.

Download this image.

 
7. No communication link with crewmembers or supervisor. Firefighters and a white fire engine are all located apart from one another in a heavily timbered area, with trees and distance between them.

7. No communication link with crewmembers or supervisor.

Known radio frequencies and channels enable instant communication within and between firefighting resources. This Watch Out shows a crew physically separated without any obvious method for communication among crew members or their supervisor.

Download this image.

8. Constructing line without safe anchor point. A red fire engine is located inside a burned area with flames all around it while a firefighter sprays water from a hose at some of the flames.

8. Constructing line without safe anchor point.

An anchor point is an advantageous location, usually a barrier to fire spread, from which to start constructing a fireline. This Watch Out depicts an engine crew working along the fire edge without a clear anchor point.

Download this image.

 

 
9. Building fireline downhill with fire below. Three firefighters use tools to dig fireline down a steep slope covered in grass and brush. Large flames are below them as the fire burns uphill.

9. Building fireline downhill with fire below.

Building fireline downhill requires special attention to safety factors because of the potential for rapid uphill fire spread. This Watch Out depicts firefighters building fireline downhill without first mitigating the existing hazards.

Download this image.

10. Attempting frontal assault on fire. Large, orange flames move towards a lone firefighter holding a shovel and standing in grass and brush.

10. Attempting frontal assault on fire.

It is safer to start firefighting where the activity is lesser or the fire is moving away from firefighters. This Watch Out shows a firefighter in a position where he would be unable to safely engage in fire suppression.

Download this image.

 

 
11. Unburned fuel between you and fire. A yellow bulldozer leaves a fireline of dirt behind it. Thick brush is between the line and the fire.

11. Unburned fuel between you and fire.

Heavy equipment is often used to construct fireline to slow fire progression because it can build wider fireline at a faster rate. This Watch Out requires extra situational awareness because there is unburned fuel between the bulldozer and the main fire.

Download this image.

12. Cannot see main fire; not in contact with someone who can. Several firefighters are digging on a fireline. Trees and rocks separate a single firefighter from the rest of the crew. The lone firefighter is near a water tank.

12. Cannot see main fire; not in contact with someone who can.

Lookouts, Communications, Escape Routes, and Safety Zones (LCES) are the foundation to safe fire suppression actions. This Watch Out depicts a crew member working away from his crew without a radio or other form of communication to be alerted to sudden changes in weather or fire behavior.

Download this image.

 
13. On a hillside where rolling material can ignite fuel below. Several firefighters use tools to dig fireline up a steep hill. Above them, logs and trees are on fire.

13. On a hillside where rolling material can ignite fuel below.

Fires can move more quickly uphill. This Watch Out shows rolling logs and debris that are on fire and can ignite fuels below the crew building fireline.

Download this image.

14. Weather becoming hotter and drier. Several firefighters are working near a fire that is growing. One sprays water on a small flame that is separate from the main fire which appears to be growing in size. The sun is shining brightly.

14. Weather becoming hotter and drier.

Hot temperatures and low relative humidity increase fire behavior. This Watch Out portrays a hot, dry afternoon with firefighters working to suppress a growing fire.

Download this image.

 
15. Wind increases and/or changes direction. A yellow and white helicopter is hovering over the ground with a dark, stormy sky in the background. Wind blows a red and white windsock.

15. Wind increases and/or changes direction.

Wind can significantly impact the rate and direction of fire spread. This Watch Out shows how it can also have an impact on aviation fire resources, such as helicopters.

Download this image.

16. Getting frequent spot fires across line. In tall, thick timber, a fire is actively burning on the left side of the road. On the right side, firefighters are spraying water and digging with tools on spot fires. Behind them, a green fire engine is driving on the road.

16. Getting frequent spot fires across line.

Spot fires occur when embers land on the unburned side of a fireline. This Watch Out depicts an engine crew attempting to contain several spot fires which are increasing in size while the main fire is also growing.

Download this image.

 
17. Terrain and fuels make escape to safety zones difficult. Three firefighters carry heavy packs and chainsaws as they walk through an area with lots of rocks, downed trees and logs, timber, and standing dead trees.

17. Terrain and fuels make escape to safety zones difficult.

Rocks, dead and down trees, heavy fuels, and steep terrain can make escape to safety zones slow and difficult. This Watch Out shows firefighters already weighed down by heavy fire gear and tools trying to walk through uneven terrain and heavy fuels.

Download this image.

18. Taking a nap near fireline. A fire is burning on the left side. Four firefighters lie on the ground napping on the right side.

18. Taking a nap near fireline.

Managing fatigue during wildland fire suppression is important for firefighter health and safety. This Watch Out depicts fire behavior increasing while firefighters take a nap without a lookout.

Download this image.

 

Las 10 Normas Para Combatir Incendios y las 18 Situaciones Que Gritan Cuidado, como son referidas en la Guía de Respuesta de Incidente de Bolsillo (GRI/IRPG), PMS 461 ES, proporcionan a combatientes forestales un conjunto consistente de mejores prácticas y una serie de escenarios para tomar en cuenta al responder a un incendio forestal.

Las 10 Normas Para Combatir Incendios están organizadas de manera deliberada y secuencial para se implementadas sistemáticamente y aplicadas a todas las situaciones de incendio.

Las 18 Situaciones que Gritan Cuidado son más específicas y cautelosas, describiendo situaciones que amplifican las 10 Normas Para Combatir Incendios con la intención de que si combatientes siguen las Normas Para Combatir Incendio y son advertidos a las 18 Situaciones Que Gritan Cuidado, gran parte del riesgo del combate de incendios se puede reducir.

View the NWCG 10 & 18 Poster.

Download the zip file (15 MB) with all 18 individual images and the poster.

Haga clic para amplificar la imagen.

1. Incendio no explorado ni medido. Un combatiente rodeado de vegetación verde mira a través de binoculares en una dirección. Detrás de él, muy retirado se devisa el humo de un incendio forestal.

1. Incendio no explorado ni medido.

Combatientes forestales exploran y miden todo incidente para aumentar su conocimiento situacional antes de iniciar la supresión del incendio. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado, muestran a un combatiente quien está muy retirado a describir con eficacia el comportamiento del incendio, tipos de combustibles y las condiciones del tiempo en el incendio.

Descargue esta imagen.

2. Estar en terreno no visto a la luz del día. Tres combatientes llevan herramientas caminan en la oscuridad. Sus lámparas del casco iluminan un arbusto grande delante de ellos.

2. Estar en terreno no visto a la luz del día.

Los recursos de combate de incendios muy a menudo son llamados para responder a incendios durante la noche en terrenos desconocidos. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestran a combatientes trabajando de noche en un área que ven por primera vez, lo cual requiere atención adicional a los alrededores y precaución mientras trabajan.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
 
3. Zonas seguras y rutas de escape no identificadas. Tres combatientes caminan en direcciones separadas. Alrededor de ellos hay árboles ya consumidos por el fuego y llamas en árboles aun ardiendo.

3. Zonas seguras y rutas de escape no identificadas.

Vigilantes, Comunicaciones, Rutas de Escape y las Zonas de Seguridad (VCRZ) son un enfoque crítico que todo combatiente forestales utiliza al comprometerse a la supresión de incendios de manera segura. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado representa a una brigada sin rutas de escape o zonas de seguridad establecidas.

Descargue esta imagen.

 

 

4. Desconocer las condiciones del tiempo y factores locales que influyen en el comportamiento del fuego. Tres combatientes examinan instrumentos meteorológicos mientras están parados en un área amplia, cubierta de pasto. En la distancia grandes nubes blancas parecen crecer en el cielo.

4. Desconocer las condiciones del tiempo y factores locales que influyen en el comportamiento del fuego.

Los pronósticos del tiempo juegan un papel crucial en la planificación y supresión de todas las operaciones y actividades de incendios forestal y prescrito. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado representa a combatientes adquieren información sobre el tiempo atmosférico pero aparentemente inconscientes de la tormenta de nubes que se aproximan lo cual afectarían directamente el comportamiento del fuego.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
5. No estar informado(a) de las estrategias, tácticas y riesgos. Un fuego arde en una ladera. Un tanque aéreo blanco descarga retardante rojo enfrente, donde no hay llamas visibles.

5. No estar informado(a) de las estrategias, tácticas y riesgos.

Combatientes forestales dependen en estrategias y tácticas coordinadas para suprimir incendios eficientemente y evitar riesgos. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado demuestra a un tanque aéreo descargando retardante lejos del área intencionada, potencialmente indicando comunicación incomprensible.

Descargue esta imagen.

6. Instrucciones y deberes incompresibles. En el lado derecho de la imagen, un combatiente utiliza una antorcha de goteo para encender el pasto. En el lado izquierdo de la imagen dos combatientes rocían agua de una motobomba amarillo a pasto ardiendo.

6. Instrucciones y deberes incompresibles.

El Sistema de Mando de Incidentes (ICS por sus siglas en inglés) se utiliza para proporcionar una cadena de mando uniforme en todo incidente. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra a una brigada de motobomba trabajando de una manera contraproducente, sin instrucciones claras de cuál será el resultado final.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
7. No hay comunicación con miembros de su cuadrilla y/o supervisor. Combatientes y una motobomba blanca están separados uno del otro en un bosque denso, en el área, existen árboles entre ellos.

7. No hay comunicación con miembros de su cuadrilla y/o supervisor.

Las frecuencias y canales de radio conocidas permiten la comunicación instantánea dentro y entre los recursos de combate de incendios. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra a una brigada físicamente separada sin ningún método obvio de comunicación entre miembros de la brigada o su supervisor.

Descargue esta imagen.

8. Construir línea/brecha sin un punto de ancla seguro. Una motobomba roja está ubicada adentro de un área quemada con llamas a su alrededor mientras un combatiente rocía agua de una manguera ah algunas de las llamas.

8. Construir línea/brecha sin un punto de ancla seguro.

Un punto de anclaje es una ubicación ventajosa, generalmente una barrera contra la propagación del fuego, desde donde comenzar a construir una línea/brecha de fuego. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado representa una brigada de motobomba trabajando a lo largo del borde de fuego sin un punto de anclaje claro.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
9. Construir línea/brecha cuesta abajo con incendio abajo. Tres combatientes usando herramientas construyen línea de fuego en una ladera inclinada, cubierta de pasto y maleza. Grandes llamas están debajo de ellos y el fuego arde cuesta arriba.

9. Construir línea/brecha cuesta abajo con incendio abajo.

Construir línea/brecha de fuego cuesta abajo requiere atención especial a los factores de seguridad debido al potencial de propagación cuesta arriba rápida del fuego. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra a combatientes construyendo línea/brecha de fuego cuesta abajo sin mitigar primero los riesgos existentes.

Descargue esta imagen.

10. Intentar combatir el incendio de frente. Grandes llamas anaranjadas se mueven hacia un combatiente solitario sosteniendo una pala, parado en medio del pasto y maleza.

10. Intentar combatir el incendio de frente.

Es más seguro comenzar a combatir el incendio donde existe menos actividad o donde el fuego se está alejando de los combatientes. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra a un combatiente en una posición en la que no podrá iniciar a combatir el fuego de forma segura.

Descargue esta imagen.

 

 

 
11. Combustible no quemado entre usted y el incendio. Una excavadora amarilla deja atrás una línea de fuego de tierra. Existe arbusto pesado entre la línea y el fuego.

11. Combustible no quemado entre usted y el incendio.

Equipo pesado a menudo se usa para construir línea de fuego para detener la progresión del incendio ya que puede construir línea de fuego más amplia a un ritmo más rápido. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado requiere un conocimiento situacional extra debido a que existe combustible sin quemar entre la excavadora y el incendio principal.

Descargue esta imagen.

 

 

12. No puede ver el incendio principal; ni estar en contacto con alguien que pueda. Varios combatientes están construyendo línea de fuego. Arboles y rocas separan a un combatiente del resto de la brigada. El combatiente solitario está cerca de un tanque de agua portátil.

12. No puede ver el incendio principal; ni estar en contacto con alguien que pueda.

Vigilantes, Comunicaciones, Rutas de Escape y las Zonas de Seguridad (VCRZ) son la base para acciones seguras de supresión de incendios. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra a un miembro de brigada trabajando retirado de su brigada sin radio u otra forma de comunicación para ser alertado sobre cambios repentinos del tiempo atmosférico o del comportamiento del fuego.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
13.Estar en la ladera donde material rodando puede encender combustible abajo. Varios combatientes usando herramientas construyen línea de fuego en una ladera inclinada. Encima de ellos, troncos y árboles están en llamas.

13. Estar en la ladera donde material rodando puede encender combustible abajo.

Los incendios pueden moverse más rápido cuesta arriba. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra troncos y escombros ardiendo rodando que pueden encender combustibles debajo de la brigada que está construyendo línea.

Descargue esta imagen.

14. El tiempo se está poniendo más caliente y reseco. Varios combatientes están trabajando cerca de un incendio que está creciendo. Uno de ellos rocía agua ah una pequeña llama que está separada del fuego principal que parece estar creciendo en tamaño. El sol está brillando intensamente.

14. El tiempo se está poniendo más caliente y reseco.

Altas temperaturas y la baja humedad relativa aumentan el comportamiento del fuego. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado representa una tarde calurosa y reseca con combatientes trabajando para suprimir un fuego creciente.

Descargue esta imagen.

 

 

 
15. El viento aumenta y/o cambia de dirección. Un helicóptero amarillo y blanco está suspendido sobre el suelo con un cielo oscuro y tormentoso en el fondo. El viento sopla una bandera roja y blanca de viento.

15. El viento aumenta y/o cambia de dirección.

El viento puede afectar significativamente la velocidad y la dirección de la propagación del fuego. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra cómo también puede tener un impacto a los recursos de aviación de incendio, como los helicópteros.

Descargue esta imagen.

 

 

16.Frecuentemente obteniendo focos secundarios a través de la línea/brecha de control. En un bosque denso con árboles altos, un fuego arde activamente en el lado izquierdo del camino. En el lado derecho, combatientes están rociando agua y con herramientas cavando alrededor de focos secundarios. Detrás de ellos, una motobomaba verde transita por la carretera.

16. Frecuentemente obteniendo focos secundarios a través de la línea/brecha de control.

Los focos secundarios ocurren cuando brasas aterrizan en el lado no quemado de una línea/brecha de control. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado representa una brigada de motobomba intentando contener varios focos secundarios que están aumentando intensidad mientras el fuego principal también está creciendo.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
17.	El terreno y combustible hacen difícil el escape hacia las zonas de seguridad. Tres combatientes cargando mochilas pesadas y motosierras caminan por un área con bastantes rocas, árboles y troncos caídos y arboles secos aun en pie.

17. El terreno y combustible hacen difícil el escape hacia las zonas de seguridad.

Rocas, árboles secos y caídos, combustibles pesado y el terreno inclinado pueden hacer que el escape a zonas de seguridad sea lento y difícil. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado muestra a combatientes ya agobiados por el peso del equipo y herramientas de incendio intentan caminar en terreno irregular y combustibles pesado.

Descargue esta imagen.

18.	Tomar una siesta cerca de la línea/brecha de control. Un fuego arde en el lado izquierdo. En el lado derecho, cuatro combatientes están en el suelo tomando una siesta.

18. Tomar una siesta cerca de la línea/brecha de control.

Controlar la fatiga durante la supresión de incendios forestales es importante para la salud y seguridad de combatientes. Esta Situación que Grita Cuidado representa el comportamiento del fuego aumentando intensidad mientras que combatientes toman una siesta sin vigilante.

Descargue esta imagen.