10 Standard Firefighting Orders, PMS 110

The 10 Standard Firefighting Orders and the 18 Watch Out Situations, as referenced in the Incident Response Pocket Guide (IRPG), PMS 461, provide wildland firefighters with a set of consistent best practices and a series of scenarios to be mindful of when responding to a wildland fire.

The 10 Standard Firefighting Orders are organized in a deliberate and sequential way to be implemented systematically and applied to all fire situations.

The 18 Watch Out Situations are more specific and cautionary, describing situations that expand the 10 Standard Firefighting Orders with the intent that if firefighters follow the Standard Firefighting Orders and are alerted to the 18 Watch Out Situations, much of the risk of firefighting can be reduced.

View the NWCG 10 & 18 Poster.

Download the zip file (14 MB) with all 10 individual images and the poster.

Click on image to enlarge.

1. Keep informed on fire weather conditions and forecasts. A firefighter talks into the radio as he stands near remote weather equipment. Smoke and flame are visible in the distance.

1. Keep informed on fire weather conditions and forecasts.

Weather conditions can significantly impact fire behavior, and weather forecasts help firefighters anticipate changes. This Standard Firefighting Order shows a remote automated weather station (RAWS) which sends real-time weather information to incident fire personnel.

Download this image.

2. Know what your fire is doing at all times. A firefighter, wearing a pack and holding a tool, stands on a ridge while talking into a radio. On the left hillside, several firefighters are digging on a spot fire. On the right, the main fire is burning uphill. A helicopter is also flying over the fire.

2. Know what your fire is doing at all times.

Current and accurate information about fire behavior and weather conditions is critical to firefighter safety. This Standard Firefighting Order demonstrates how lookouts are used to gather and communicate details on fire behavior.

Download this image.

 
3. Base all actions on current and expected behavior of the fire. A firefighter looks at his watch, which reads 2 PM, while a fire actively grows in steep terrain and heavy timber.

3. Base all actions on current and expected behavior of the fire.

Fire managers make decisions throughout the day on how to suppress fires and best use resources while protecting life and property. This Standard Firefighting Order depicts a firefighter observing increased fire behavior during a time of day when temperatures are high and relative humidity is low.

Download this image.

4. Identify escape routes and safety zones, and make them known. A fire crew is walking through a meadow on a path lined with pink flagging. Behind them, a fire is growing in heavy timber.

4. Identify escape routes and safety zones, and make them known.

Lookouts, Communications, Escape Routes, and Safety Zones (LCES) are the foundation to safe fire suppression actions. This Standard Firefighting Order shows a crew utilizing a predesignated escape route to safely move away from an active fire.

Download this image.
 

 
5. Post lookouts when there is possible danger. A firefighter works by a water pump in a creek. Two firefighters spray water onto flames. And another firefighter talks into a radio while observing all firefighters.

5. Post lookouts when there is possible danger.

Lookouts provide time-sensitive information to firefighters. This Standard Firefighting Order demonstrates firefighters installing a pump and hose lay with a designated lookout to keep watch for and communicate possible hazards.

Download this image.

6. Be alert. Keep calm. Think clearly. Act decisively. On the left side of a split screen, four firefighters stand near a wildland fire, listening to a radio in the hands of one. On the right side of the screen, a supervisory firefighter talks into a handheld radio.

6. Be alert. Keep calm. Think clearly. Act decisively.

Remaining alert, keeping calm, thinking clearly, and acting decisively are important components of decision-making on wildland fire incidents. This Standard Firefighting Order illustrates a supervisor providing direction and establishing leader's intent to help a crew working on a growing fire.

Download this image.

 
7. Maintain prompt communications with your forces, your supervisor, and adjoining forces. A bulldozer is on one side of a fire burning in palmetto, and a fire engine and water tender are on the other. A supervisory firefighter is in the middle talking into the radio and gesturing to the bulldozer.

7. Maintain prompt communications with your forces, your supervisor, and adjoining forces.

The Incident Command System (ICS) relies on interagency communications between firefighting resources for collaborative fire suppression. This Standard Firefighting Order shows a variety of firefighting resources working together to effectively suppress a wildland fire.

Download this image.

8. Give clear instructions and be sure they are understood. About 20 firefighters stand in a semi-circle in front of two crew buggies where a map has been put up. A supervisory firefighter points at the map and speaks to the group.

8. Give clear instructions and be sure they are understood.

Briefings are opportunities to share information, plan tactics, and ask questions. This Standard Firefighting Order illustrates a briefing from a supervisor to the personnel working on the fireline.

Download this image.

 
9. Maintain control of your forces at all times. A crew boss is gesturing to a wildland fire crew walking along a path away from a fire burning in grass and cacti. A Single-Engine Airtanker (SEAT) is flying over dropping red retardant on the flames.

9. Maintain control of your forces at all times.

Building and maintaining crew cohesion promotes trust among crew members and leadership. This Standard Firefighting Order demonstrates a crew following direction from their supervisor to avoid hazards, including the approaching airtanker.

Download this image.

10. Fight fire aggressively, having provided for safety first. A green fire engine is driving through thick grass and sage. Three firefighters are spraying water at a fire's edge. Along a road in the foreground, pink flagging is tied to brush to indicate an escape route.

10. Fight fire aggressively, having provided for safety first.

The safety of firefighters and the public is always the top priority of wildland fire management agencies. This Standard Firefighting Order portrays an engine crew, with a clearly identified escape route in place, suppressing an active wildland fire .

Download this image.

 

Las 10 Normas Para Combatir Incendios y las 18 Situaciones Que Gritan Cuidado, como son referidas en la Guía de Respuesta de Incidente de Bolsillo (GRI/IRPG), PMS 461 ES, proporcionan a combatientes forestales un conjunto consistente de mejores prácticas y una serie de escenarios para tomar en cuenta al responder a un incendio forestal.

Las 10 Normas Para Combatir Incendios están organizadas de manera deliberada y secuencial para se implementadas sistemáticamente y aplicadas a todas las situaciones de incendio.

Las 18 Situaciones que Gritan Cuidado son más específicas y cautelosas, describiendo situaciones que amplifican las 10 Normas Para Combatir Incendios con la intención de que si combatientes siguen las Normas Para Combatir Incendio y son advertidos a las 18 Situaciones Que Gritan Cuidado, gran parte del riesgo del combate de incendios se puede reducir.

View the NWCG 10 & 18 Poster.

Download the zip file (14 MB) with all 10 individual images and the poster.

Haga clic para amplificar la imagen.

1. Manténgase informado(a) sobre las condiciones del tiempo y pronósticos del incendio. Un combatiente habla por radio cerca de un equipo meteorológica remoto. En la distancia, se devisa humo y llamas.

1. Manténgase informado(a) sobre las condiciones del tiempo y pronósticos del incendio.

Las condiciones del tiempo atmosférico pueden impactar significativamente el comportamiento del fuego y los pronósticos del tiempo ayudan a los combatientes ah anticipar los cambios. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio muestra una estación meteorológica automatizada remota (RAWS por su siglas en inglés) que envía información meteorológica en tiempo real a personal del incendio del incidente.

Descargue esta imagen.

2. Sepa lo que está haciendo su incendio en todo momento. Un combatiente cargando una mochila y sosteniendo una herramienta, está parado en un cerro hablando por radio. En la ladera izquierda, varios combatientes están cavando para extinguir un foco secundario. En la ladera derecha, el fuego principal está ardiendo cuesta arriba. Un helicóptero está volando sobre el fuego.

2. Sepa lo que está haciendo su incendio en todo momento.

Información actual y precisa sobre el comportamiento del fuego y las condiciones del tiempo atmosférico son críticas para la seguridad de los combatientes. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio muestra cómo se utilizan vigilantes para reunir y comunicar detalles sobre el comportamiento del fuego.

Descargue esta imagen.

 

 

 
3. Base todas acción en reciente y supuesto comportamiento del incendio. Un combatiente mira su reloj, que marca las 2 de la tarde, mientras un fuego crece activamente en terrenos inclinado y combustible pesado.

3. Base todas acción en reciente y supuesto comportamiento del incendio.

Los gerentes de incendio toman decisiones durante todo el día sobre cómo suprimir incendios y como mejor utilizar los recursos mientras protegen la vida y propiedad. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio muestra a un combatiente observando como aumenta el comportamiento del fuego durante un cierto tiempo del día cuando las temperaturas son están altas y la humedad relativa es baja.

Descargue esta imagen.

4. Identifique rutas de escape y zonas y hágalas saber. Una brigada de incendio está caminando a través de una pradera en un sendero marcado con listón color de rosa, detrás de ellos, un fuego está creciendo en combustible pesado.

4. Identifique rutas de escape y zonas y hágalas saber.

Vigilantes, Comunicaciones, Rutas de Escape y las Zonas de Seguridad (VCRZ) son la base para las acciones seguras de supresión de incendios. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio muestra a una brigada utilizando una ruta de escape previamente designada para retirarse con seguridad de un incendio activo.
 

Descargue esta imagen.

 
5. Establezca vigilantes cuando existe posibilidad de peligro. Un combatiente trabaja junto a una bomba de agua en un arroyo. Dos combatientes rocían agua sobre las llamas. Y otro combatiente habla por radio mientras observa a todos los combatientes.

5. Establezca vigilantes cuando existe posibilidad de peligro.

Vigilantes proporcionan información urgente a combatientes Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio muestra a combatientes instalando una bomba y un tendido de manguera con un vigilante designado para comunicar posibles peligros.

Descargue esta imagen.

6. Manténgase alerta. Conserve la calma. Piense con claridad. Actúe en forma decisiva. En el lado izquierdo de una pantalla dividida, cuatro combatientes están parados cerca de un incendio forestal, escuchando la conversación del radio en las manos de uno de ellos. En el lado derecho de la pantalla, un supervisor habla por un radio portátil.

6. Manténgase alerta. Conserve la calma. Piense con claridad. Actúe en forma decisiva.

Mantenerse en alerta, y calmado(a), pensar claramente, y actuar decisivamente son componentes importantes de la toma de decisiones en incendios forestales. Esta Norma de Combate de incendio muestra a un supervisor proporcionando dirección y estableciendo la intención del líder para ayudar a una brigada que trabaja en un incendio creciente.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
7. Mantenga alerto(a) y calmado(a). Piense claramente. Actué decisivamente. Una excavadora está a un lado de un incendio que arde en palmeras, en el otro lado están, una motobomba y una cisterna de agua. Un supervisor está en el medio hablando por radio y señalando hacia la excavadora.

7. Mantenga alerto(a) y calmado(a). Piense claramente. Actué decisivamente.

El Sistema de Mando de Incidentes (ICS por sus siglas en inglés) se basa en las comunicaciones interinstitucionales entre los recursos de incendio para una colaborativa supresión de incendios. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio representa una variedad de recursos de supresión de incendios trabajando juntos para suprimir un incendio forestal eficientemente.

Descargue esta imagen.

8. De instrucciones claras y aseguré que son entendidas. Como 20 combatientes están parados en semicírculo frente a dos camiones de la brigada donde se ha colocado un mapa. Un supervisor señala al mapa y habla con el grupo.

8. De instrucciones claras y aseguré que son entendidas.

Los breves informativos son oportunidades para compartir información, planificar tácticas y hacer preguntas. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio muestra un breve informativo de un supervisor al personal que trabaja en la línea de fuego.

Descargue esta imagen.

 
9. Mantenga control de su cuadrilla en todo momento. Un jefe de brigada está señalando a una brigada de combatientes forestales que caminan por un sendero alejándose de un incendio que arde en pasto y cactos. Un Tanque Aéreo de un Solo Motor está tirando retardante rojo sobre las llamas.

9. Mantenga control de su cuadrilla en todo momento.

Construir y mantener la cohesión de una brigada promueve la confianza y liderazgo entre los miembros. Esta Norma para Combatir incendio demuestra una brigada siguiendo las instrucciones de su supervisor para evitar riesgos, incluyendo el tanque aéreo que se aproxima.

Descargue esta imagen.

10. Combata incendio agresivamente, habiendo proveído por la seguridad primero. Una motobomba verde transita por de pasto y artemisa densa. Tres combatientes están rociando agua al borde del fuego. En frente, a lo largo de un camino, hay listón color de rosa atado en el arbusto, para indicar una ruta de escape.

10. Combata incendio agresivamente, habiendo proveído por la seguridad primero.

La seguridad de los combatientes y del público siempre es la principal prioridad de las agencias de manejo de incendios forestales. Esta Norma para Combatir Incendio refleja una brigada de motobomba suprimiendo un incendio forestal activo, con una ruta de escape presente claramente identificada.

Descargue esta imagen.