2016 WOR Day 5: Leadership and Human Performance

Category: 
Week of Remembrance
Page Last Modified / Reviewed: 
Jun 2020

Ribbon symbol for survivor next to the Wildland Fire Leadership logoWeek of Remembrance June 30-July 6, 2016

Recent research in the wildland fire community has shown that the most highly regarded, highest performing, and safest leaders are those who are more mindful of themselves, others, and the environment (Waldron & Ebbeck, 2015). Leadership begins by knowing and leading oneself, followed by leading others. Like a compass guiding the direction through changing terrain, knowing and being mindful of one’s deepest motives and desires (values) as a leader can serve as an internal guide to leading the self and others through the easiest and most difficult situations. By exploring, identifying and being aware (or mindful) of your deepest motives for how you want to behave and act as a person and leader on an ongoing basis will enable you to lead yourself and others most effectively.

Below is an exercise to identify and reflect on important values as a leader. There are no “right” or “wrong” answers.

  • Take a few minutes and note five values that best complete the sentence for you personally.

Then

  • Take a few minutes and discuss as a crew or with other coworkers - what values are most important for a leader of your crew/group to have? Why?

Complete the following sentence: " _________________ is a ‘cornerstone’ in my approach to leadership."
 

(Exercise Modified fromTom Siebold)

ADVENTURE

ASSERTIVENESS

AUTHENTICITY

CHALLENGE

COMFORT

CONFORMITY

CONNECTION

CONTROL

COOPERATION

COMPASSION

CREATIVITY

CURIOSITY

DIRECTNESS

EQUALITY

EXPERTNESS

FAIRNESS

FITNESS

FLEXIBILITY

FREEDOM

GRATITUDE

HAPPINESS

HARD WORK

HARMONY HELPFULNESS

HONESTY

HUMILITY

HUMOR

INVOLVEMENT

ORDER

INDEPENDENCE

INTEGRITY

KINDNESS

 LOYALTY

MINDFULNESS

MORALITY/ETHICS

OPEN-MINDEDNESS

PATIENCE

PERSISTENCE 

POWER

PREDICTABILITY

RESPONSIBILITY

RESPONSIVENESS

RECOGNITION SECURITY

SELF-AWARENESS

SELF-CARE

SELF-DEVELOPMENT SELF-RESPECT

SKILLFULNESS

SUPPORTIVENESS

TRADITION

TRUST

VARIETY

WISDOM

OTHER VALUES:

_______________

_______________

 

graphic of mountains with mile markers of physical capacity in various locations.

The topics for the NWCG “Wildland Firefighter Week of Remembrance” have been drawn from the Human Performance Optimization course taught as a part of the USFS Apprentice Academy in cooperation with the Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) and is rooted in the desire to prepare wildland fire personnel to optimally manage themselves and others at any given time. Review and resources have been contributed by the Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center, NIFC External Affairs, the Wildland Fire annual refresher group, and the Wildland Fire Leadership Subcommittee.

 

 

Additional Resources

Incident Management Situation Report (IMSR)
Incident Response Pocket Guide (IRPG), PMS 461
NWCG Standards for Helicopter Operations, PMS 510
RT-130, Wildland Fire Safety Training Annual Refresher (WFSTAR)
Interagency Standards for Fire and Fire Aviation Operations (Red Book)
Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center

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