NWCG Standards for Fire Equipment Storage and Refurbishing, PMS 448

These national standards are maintained by the NFES committee and are applicable at National Support Caches and local units.

Comments, questions, and recommendations shall be submitted to the appropriate agency program manager assigned to the National Fire Equipment System Subcommittee. View the complete roster at https://www.nwcg.gov/committees/national-fire-equipment-system-subcommit...

Bag – Sleeping, Cloth, Washable, 3 lb. Fill

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000022
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
Yes
Storage and Shelf Life Procedure: 
Prior to shipping, inspect carton for rodent damage and/or moisture damage. If found, handle accordingly and dispose of carton and contents in appropriate manner.

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for any holes, cuts, tears, abrasions, or torn seams that cannot be repaired economically, if any dispose of.
  2. Inspect for excessive dirt or stains that laundering cannot eliminate, if any dispose of.
  3. Inspect for missing slider, damaged coils, or other defects that make zipper inoperable, repair if economical.
  4. Inspect for batting that is bunched-up or in clumps. Shake the bag several times to ensure that the batting will loft evenly, not clump or shift.
  5. Inspect for any indelible marking on the bag, if any dispose of.
  6. Inspect for any signs of body fluid stains. If there’s any question on whether the bag can be completely cleaned and sanitized, dispose of the item.
  7. Return to stock if item shows no signs of use and passes initial inspection.
  8. Dispose of item if unable to repair.
  9. Refurbish if damage detected is repairable.

Refurbishment Procedures

A. Cleaning- CLASS 4 CORDURA - SLEEPING BAGS

  1. Remove all contents not part of the bag and zip closed before laundering.
  2. Launder bags in front-loading machine. Use mild soap in water of no more than 130 °F. Bags shall undergo three wash and rinse cycles, i.e. wash, rinse, wash, rinse, wash, rinse, sterilize with a bleach solution of 50 ppm in the last wash cycle.
  3. With bag unzipped, dry in a tumble dryer with an average temperature not to exceed 130 °F. The dryer unit shall be of the reverse-action type. All bags shall be unfolded and shall tumble free. (To obtain the average temperature, test the temperature every 5 minutes and average the findings.)
  4. After drying, zip bags closed.

B. Repair

  1. Repair any hole, cut, tear, abrasion, or open seam.
  2. Replace any zipper that has damaged coils and replace any missing slider.

C. Tests for Performance

  1. Inspect cord lock to ensure spring works properly and that the cord passes freely through when the lock is disengaged.
  2. Close zipper to ensure it provides a smooth and secure closure the full length of the bag opening.
  3. Open and close the hook and pile fastener to ensure closure is adequate.
  4. Retest all hardware if it has been replaced.

D. Repackaging

  1. Package in plastic bag.
    • For NFES #000022, #000058, #000128 package 5 bags in NFES #000644 carton (33” x 16” x 22”).
    • For NFES #001062 package 10 bags in NFES #000513 carton (37.50” x 24.50” x 17”).

Bag – Sleeping, Cold Weather

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000128
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
Yes
Storage and Shelf Life Procedure: 
Prior to shipping, inspect carton for rodent damage and/or moisture damage. If found, handle accordingly and dispose of carton and contents in appropriate manner.

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for any holes, cuts, tears, abrasions, or torn seams that cannot be repaired economically, if any dispose of.
  2. Inspect for excessive dirt or stains that laundering cannot eliminate, if any dispose of.
  3. Inspect for missing slider, damaged coils, or other defects that make zipper inoperable, repair if economical.
  4. Inspect for batting that is bunched-up or in clumps. Shake the bag several times to ensure that the batting will loft evenly, not clump or shift.
  5. Inspect for any indelible marking on the bag, if any dispose of.
  6. Inspect for any signs of body fluid stains. If there’s any question on whether the bag can be completely cleaned and sanitized, dispose of the item.
  7. Return to stock if item shows no signs of use and passes initial inspection.
  8. Dispose of item if unable to repair.
  9. Refurbish if damage detected is repairable.

Refurbishment Procedures

A. Cleaning- CLASS 4 CORDURA - SLEEPING BAGS

  1. Remove all contents not part of the bag and zip closed before laundering.
  2. Launder bags in front-loading machine. Use mild soap in water of no more than 130 °F. Bags shall undergo three wash and rinse cycles, i.e. wash, rinse, wash, rinse, wash, rinse, sterilize with a bleach solution of 50 ppm in the last wash cycle.
  3. With bag unzipped, dry in a tumble dryer with an average temperature not to exceed 130 °F. The dryer unit shall be of the reverse-action type. All bags shall be unfolded and shall tumble free. (To obtain the average temperature, test the temperature every 5 minutes and average the findings.)
  4. After drying, zip bags closed.

B. Repair

  1. Repair any hole, cut, tear, abrasion, or open seam.
  2. Replace any zipper that has damaged coils and replace any missing slider.

C. Tests for Performance

  1. Inspect cord lock to ensure spring works properly and that the cord passes freely through when the lock is disengaged.
  2. Close zipper to ensure it provides a smooth and secure closure the full length of the bag opening.
  3. Open and close the hook and pile fastener to ensure closure is adequate.
  4. Retest all hardware if it has been replaced.

D. Repackaging

  1. Package in plastic bag.
    • For NFES #000022, #000058, #000128 package 5 bags in NFES #000644 carton (33” x 16” x 22”).
    • For NFES #001062 package 10 bags in NFES #000513 carton (37.50” x 24.50” x 17”).

Bag – Sleeping, Cold Weather, X-long

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000058
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
Yes
Storage and Shelf Life Procedure: 
Prior to shipping, inspect carton for rodent damage and/or moisture damage. If found, handle accordingly and dispose of carton and contents in appropriate manner.

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for any holes, cuts, tears, abrasions, or torn seams that cannot be repaired economically, if any dispose of.
  2. Inspect for excessive dirt or stains that laundering cannot eliminate, if any dispose of.
  3. Inspect for missing slider, damaged coils, or other defects that make zipper inoperable, repair if economical.
  4. Inspect for batting that is bunched-up or in clumps. Shake the bag several times to ensure that the batting will loft evenly, not clump or shift.
  5. Inspect for any indelible marking on the bag, if any dispose of.
  6. Inspect for any signs of body fluid stains. If there’s any question on whether the bag can be completely cleaned and sanitized, dispose of the item.
  7. Return to stock if item shows no signs of use and passes initial inspection.
  8. Dispose of item if unable to repair.
  9. Refurbish if damage detected is repairable.

Refurbishment Procedures

A. Cleaning- CLASS 4 CORDURA - SLEEPING BAGS

  1. Remove all contents not part of the bag and zip closed before laundering.
  2. Launder bags in front-loading machine. Use mild soap in water of no more than 130 °F. Bags shall undergo three wash and rinse cycles, i.e. wash, rinse, wash, rinse, wash, rinse, sterilize with a bleach solution of 50 ppm in the last wash cycle.
  3. With bag unzipped, dry in a tumble dryer with an average temperature not to exceed 130 °F. The dryer unit shall be of the reverse-action type. All bags shall be unfolded and shall tumble free. (To obtain the average temperature, test the temperature every 5 minutes and average the findings.)
  4. After drying, zip bags closed.

B. Repair

  1. Repair any hole, cut, tear, abrasion, or open seam.
  2. Replace any zipper that has damaged coils and replace any missing slider.

C. Tests for Performance

  1. Inspect cord lock to ensure spring works properly and that the cord passes freely through when the lock is disengaged.
  2. Close zipper to ensure it provides a smooth and secure closure the full length of the bag opening.
  3. Open and close the hook and pile fastener to ensure closure is adequate.
  4. Retest all hardware if it has been replaced.

D. Repackaging

  1. Package in plastic bag.
    • For NFES #000022, #000058, #000128 package 5 bags in NFES #000644 carton (33” x 16” x 22”).
    • For NFES #001062 package 10 bags in NFES #000513 carton (37.50” x 24.50” x 17”).

 

Bag – Sleeping, Firefighters, 36 in x 86 in

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
001062
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
Yes
Storage and Shelf Life Procedure: 
Prior to shipping, inspect carton for rodent damage and/or moisture damage. If found, handle accordingly and dispose of carton and contents in appropriate manner.

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for any holes, cuts, tears, abrasions, or torn seams that cannot be repaired economically, if any dispose of.
  2. Inspect for excessive dirt or stains that laundering cannot eliminate, if any dispose of.
  3. Inspect for missing slider, damaged coils, or other defects that make zipper inoperable, repair if economical.
  4. Inspect for batting that is bunched-up or in clumps. Shake the bag several times to ensure that the batting will loft evenly, not clump or shift.
  5. Inspect for any indelible marking on the bag, if any dispose of.
  6. Inspect for any signs of body fluid stains. If there’s any question on whether the bag can be completely cleaned and sanitized, dispose of the item.
  7. Return to stock if item shows no signs of use and passes initial inspection.
  8. Dispose of item if unable to repair.
  9. Refurbish if damage detected is repairable.

Refurbishment Procedures

A. Cleaning- CLASS 4 CORDURA - SLEEPING BAGS

  1. Remove all contents not part of the bag and zip closed before laundering.
  2. Launder bags in front-loading machine. Use mild soap in water of no more than 130 °F. Bags shall undergo three wash and rinse cycles, i.e. wash, rinse, wash, rinse, wash, rinse, sterilize with a bleach solution of 50 ppm in the last wash cycle.
  3. With bag unzipped, dry in a tumble dryer with an average temperature not to exceed 130 °F. The dryer unit shall be of the reverse-action type. All bags shall be unfolded and shall tumble free. (To obtain the average temperature, test the temperature every 5 minutes and average the findings.)
  4. After drying, zip bags closed.

B. Repair

  1. Repair any hole, cut, tear, abrasion, or open seam.
  2. Replace any zipper that has damaged coils and replace any missing slider.

C. Tests for Performance

  1. Inspect cord lock to ensure spring works properly and that the cord passes freely through when the lock is disengaged.
  2. Close zipper to ensure it provides a smooth and secure closure the full length of the bag opening.
  3. Open and close the hook and pile fastener to ensure closure is adequate.
  4. Retest all hardware if it has been replaced.

D. Repackaging

  1. Package in plastic bag.
    • For NFES #000022, #000058, #000128 package 5 bags in NFES #000644 carton (33” x 16” x 22”).
    • For NFES #001062 package 10 bags in NFES #000513 carton (37.50” x 24.50” x 17”).

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 36, Inseam 28 1/2” (S)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000501
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • None

C. Test for performance

  • None

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 36, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000507
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 36, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000508
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 38, Inseam 28 1/2” (S)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000509
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 38, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000572
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 38, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000514
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 40, Inseam 28 1/2” (S)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000517
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 40, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000518
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 40, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000519
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 42, Inseam 28 1/2” (S)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000521
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 42, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000574
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 42, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000525
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 44, Inseam 28 1/2” (S)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000527
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 44, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000539
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 44, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000545
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 46, Inseam 28 1/2” (S)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000546
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 46, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000576
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 46, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000547
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 48, Inseam 30 1/2” (R)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000567
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Flight Suit – Chest Size 48, Inseam 32 1/2” (L)

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000548
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect hook and pile fastener missing or that does not provide adequate closure, repair or dispose of. Inspect for broken zippers or missing a sliders. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure they provide an adequate and secure closure. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closures.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition
  3. Refurbish if cleaning is the only refurbishment required.
  4. Dispose of item if any damage is found in the inspection process.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf. Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza
    Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products – adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both – the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency.

B. Repairs

  • none

C. Test for performance

  • none

D. Repackaging

  • Local cache option

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 26-30” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002954
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 26-30” X 33” inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002955
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 28-32” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002956
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).
Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 28-32” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002944
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 30-34”X 34” inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002945
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 32-36” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002958
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 32-36” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002946
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 32-36” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002293
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 34-38” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002959
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 34-38” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002947
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).
Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 34-38” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002294
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 36-40” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002963
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 36-40” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002948
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 36-40” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002295
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).
Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 38-42” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002964
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).
Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 38-42” X 33” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002965
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 38-42” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002296
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 40-44” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002966
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – BDU, KEVLAR/NOMEX, 40-44” X 33” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002967
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 24-28” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002737
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 24-28” X 33” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002738
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 26-30” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002800
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 26-30” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002700
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 26-30” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002841
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 28-32” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002801
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 28-32” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002701
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 28-32” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002843
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 30-34” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002802
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 30-34” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002702
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 30-34” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002844
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 32-36” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002803
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 32-36” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002703
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 32-36” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002845
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 34-38” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002804
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 34-38” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
008704
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 34-38” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002847
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of teh same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 36-40” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002805
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 36-40” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002705
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 36-40” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002848
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the
  8. same material and construction as the original. 
  9. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 38-42” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002806
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 38-42” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002706
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 38-42” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002849
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 40-44” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002807
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 40-44” X 34” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002707
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 40-44” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002850
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 44-48” X 30” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002842
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 44-48” X 33” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002846
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Jean – Flame Resistant, BDU, 44-48” X 36” Inseam

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002851
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial Inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, burns, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (green to orange/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the jeans. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect hook and pile fastener that are missing or that do not provide adequate closure. Inspect belt loops to ensure that none are missing or broken. Check for broken zippers or missing sliders. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operations and secure closure.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and all components are in good working condition.
  3. Refurbish if repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, torn seams and broken zippers are easily repairable and economically feasible. Refurbish damage to pant leg cut off is a minimum of 30” inseam.
  4. Dispose of jeans if unrepairable damage is found in the inspection process.
  5. Exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac is NOT disposal criteria. However, extra care should be taken when handling contaminated clothing. See below for direction on processing clothing exposed to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  6. Lost or damaged cuff closure cord and side take-up tape should not be disposal criteria. It is not recommended to replace any lost or damaged cuff closure cords and side take-up tape.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning - DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1.  “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) and/or Kevla/Nomex patching material for all repairs.
  3. Hemmed pant legs that change the inseam length shall indicate the new inseam length on the white sizing label on the inside of waist band.
  4. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  5. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.
  6. Replace damaged zipper with the same type, length, and quality as the original.
  7. Replace damaged belt loops with loops of the same material and construction as the original. 
  8. Replace side take-up tape using Nomex® (Aramid) tape with a metal double-bar buckle. The replacement tape should be ⅝” wide Aramid tape, style #2007, color black.

    Order from:
    Offray Specialty Narrow Fabrics, Inc.
    4 Essex Avenue, Suite 403, Bernardsville, NJ 07924
    Ph: 908-879-3636
    sales@osnf.com
    The replacement buckle should be Albest Metal Stamping Corp. part # BB340-10BD, ⅝” black or ITW Waterbury Part #00482-09-21883.

    Order from:
    Albest Metal Stamping Corp.
    One Kent Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211-1014
    Ph: 718-388-6000
    info@albest.com
    Or
    ITW Waterbury
    952 South Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06706
    Ph: 203-753-1161
    ​The first lot of pants manufactured in 2000 have thin light green side take-up tapes; later contracts have heavier black side take up-tapes. It is recommended that the loose end of the light green takeup tapes be replaced by the recommended Nomex® tape. It is not necessary to replace the tape that is holding the metal buckle.

C. Test for performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If item fails second inspection, spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Open and close the hook and pile fasteners to ensure that they provide adequate and secure closure.
  3. Open and close zipper to ensure smooth operation and a secure closure.

D. Repackaging

  1. Close fly and all pocket flaps, properly thread side take-up tape, untie cuff cord.
  2. With inseams meeting, fold pants from the leg bottom up toward the waist band to an overall length of about 23”.
  3. Pack 30 pairs of the same size pants in carton NFES #002007 (24” x 16” x 16”).

 

Reference: 

Leigh Fibers Inc.
Nelson Smith
1101 Syphirt Rd Wellford, SC 29385
Ph: 864-439-4111
Make contact with vendor to establish requirements and feasibility.

 

Shirt – Fire, 3XL

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002910
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, 3XL-L

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002911
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, Large

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000579
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, Large, Long

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002078
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, Medium

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000578
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, Medium, Long

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000569
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, Small

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000577
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, Small, Long

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000511
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, X-Large

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000580
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, X-Large, Long

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
002079
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, X-Small

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000522
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, XX-Large

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000570
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).

 

Shirt – Fire, XX-Large, Long

NFES Status: 
Active
NFES Number: 
000512
Category: 
Clothing
Updated: 
2017-05
Storage and Shelf Life Checks: 
None

Initial inspection/Disposal Criteria

  1. Inspect for holes, cuts, tears, or torn seams. Inspect for color change (yellow to white/pink) caused by exposure to heat. Dye sublimation is the result of heat baking the dye out of the fabric. Areas of fabric with dye sublimation do not affect the performance of the shirt. Charring (hard brittle fabric that will then form a hole) in association with sublimation will decrease the performance of the fabric and the item should be disposed of. Inspect for loose or missing buttons, burn marks, stains and any sign of exposure to poison ivy/oak/sumac.
  2. Return to stock if item is clean and in unused condition.
  3. Refurbish any missing buttons, holes or seams. Launder each item following cleaning instructions.
  4. Dispose of item when repairs are not economically feasible or would make item unsafe for use.

Refurbishing Procedures

A. Cleaning

DO NOT USE BLEACH TO CLEAN FABRIC.

  1. Follow the cleaning procedures described in the publication, Nomex®- Aramid Fiber -Laundering Guide (H71603), http://www.dupont.com/content/dam/dupont/products-and-services/personal-protective-equipment/thermal-protective-apparel-and-accessories/documents/DPT_Nomex_Laundering_Guide.pdf
    Additional information can be obtained by calling DuPont at 1–800–453–8527 or by writing:
    DuPont Advanced Fibers Systems
    Chestnut Run Plaza Laurel Run Building
    Wilmington, DE 19880-0705
  2. Abbreviated washing procedures from above publication:
    1. “Garments of NOMEX® should be washed separately from other articles to avoid contamination with lint of flammable fibers.”
    2. “Tests show that formulations designed for use at a temperature of l40 °F (60 °C) or less – such as high-surfactant, low-alkalinity products - adequately clean NOMEX® and provide the best fabric color retention.”
    3. “For heavily stained and oily garments of NOMEX®, a higher temperature wash formula may be required for adequate cleaning.”
    4. “Garments made of NOMEX® must be adequately rinsed to remove residual wash chemicals.”
    5. “In some instances, tumble dry conditioning is the only finishing necessary for garments of NOMEX®.”
    6. “…dry cleaning is an alternative method of removing heavy soil and may be preferable to repeated high-temperature washing.”
  3. If items are taken to vendor laundry facilities for refurbishment; ensure that they receive a copy of this refurbishment standard. The laundry facility must satisfy both--the requirements as set by the manufacturer specification and the agreement made with the local agency. 

Nomex® Clothing Exposed to Poison Oak/Ivy/Sumac

RESEARCH

At the request of the National Support Cache Refurbishing Standards Committee, MTDC researched the practicality of laundering Nomex firefighting clothing that has been contaminated with urushiol oil (the allergen to which the body reacts) from poison oak/ivy/sumac exposure. Current cache practices range from normal washing procedures to disposal of shirts and pants that have known urushiol contamination.

A search of on-line sources didn’t produce any special care instructions beyond normal laundering. Some examples:

  • “All clothing should be laundered, and everything else that may be contaminated with urushiol should be washed thoroughly.” American Academy of Dermatology. 
  • “…be sure to wash your clothing promptly with detergent…” Mayo Clinic. 
  • “Washing clothes with ordinary laundry soap will remove urushiol.” Missouri Department of Conservation.

A phone conversation with Daniel Boelman, RN, BSN, Customer Service Manager with Zanfel Laboratories, Inc. also indicated no special treatment beyond normal laundering. (Zanfel produces a commercially available poison oak/ivy cream). Mr. Boelman recommended using vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing.

On 11/17/2008 the Forest Service filed a SAFENET Supplemental Corrective Action concerning poison oak reactions experienced by firefighters during the 2008 fire season in California. In that posting, it is recommended that “All clothing and equipment should be laundered immediately …A degreaser was recommended for helping to remove urushiol from clothing and equipment.”

RECOMMENDATION

MTDC recommends that fire clothing contaminated with urushiol oil be cleaned following normal Nomex laundering procedures. Extra care should be exercised when handling the contaminated clothing. Clearly labeled plastic bags should be used to separate contaminated clothing from other returned clothing. Commercial laundry personnel should wear long sleeves and vinyl gloves when handling contaminated clothing and dispose of any bags used for transporting the clothes to the laundering facility. As an extra precaution, supply cache and laundry workers could apply an over-the-counter skin-barrier product that contains bentoquatum (such as Ivy Block or Stokoguard) before handling contaminated clothing. Bentoquatum helps prevent urushiol from penetrating the skin. After exposure, workers’ clothes should be washed and gloves disposed of. 

B. Repairs

  1. Repair holes, cuts, tears, burns, and torn seams by darning, patching, or by duplicating the original construction.
  2. Use Nomex® (Aramid) patching material for all repairs.
  3. Re-stitch frayed buttonholes using a buttonhole or zigzag stitch that has 50 to 60 stitches per buttonhole.
  4. Replace damaged hook and pile fastener tape with tape of the same length, width, and quality as the original.

C. Testing for Performance

  1. Inspect items after laundering to ensure all foreign matter and stains have been removed. If items fail second inspection spot treat problem areas or remove item from service.
  2. Test all replacement hook and pile fasteners after repair. 

D. Repackaging 

  • 30 each of same NFES #/size in NFES#002030 carton (24”X16”X12”).